Monthly Archives: April 2014

Four Continents AGG and Koop Cup 2014 (May 2-3)

Four Continents AGG and Koop Cup 2014 (May 2-3)

Score2u will be reporting results live at Four Continents (AGG) Championship and Koop Cup 2014.


This is the first Four Continent Championship for AGG with athletes from Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Koop Cup covers rhythmic gymnastics and have individuals and group from Canada, Russia, Finland, USA, Mexico, Japan, Lithuania, Ukraine and Spain.

For scoring, one of the major differences between AGG and RG is that in addition to the Difficulty and Execution panel, AGG also have an artistic panel. To show the artistic panel, all you have to do is to go to >Special and set the checkbox for AV ON and click the “Modify View” button.

For apparatus finals, Koop Cup is applying a one per country rule while Four Continents apply a max of 2 per country rule. All these are configurable via the FINALS tab. However, the limitation is that a single parameter applies for everything within the workbook. Therefore, to keep things easy, scores are kept as two distinct events throughout.

Good luck to everyone!

New and improved release V0401

New and improved release V0401


New or improved features added to the scoring program as triggered by Pacific Rim:

  • Add event logo – We need to add event logo as well as sponsors at the bottom. To make it easier, the program allows you to modify the templates for your competition. Please see below for sample.
  • Finals for international events – This is not applicable for Elite nor Nationals because we have Competition A and B which have its own technical rules. For World Cup as well as Pacific Rim, they may want to do a draw by ranking in advance and get that published. The program now supports that if needed. Furthermore, the program allows the user explicitly paired up events if they do not want to use the default double panel logic. The program even reminds you to update the live score database after the finalists have been populated into the program.
  • Team calculation – The program’s team calculation has been improved to include Team 6-5-4. Furthermore, it has logic to determine “Top club”, “Top province” as required at Canadian National Championship.
  • Music Interface – the rotation order generated can be used by the music program.

2014 Western Regionals statistics

2014 Western Regionals statistics

There are always more stories behind each of the numbers but nonetheless, numbers do give us a perspective of trend and direction when compared year to year. This year’s Western is attended by more than 200 athletes.

Province Count Stream
AB 12 National
AB 26 Regional
BC 3 Groups
BC 42 National
BC 49 Regional
MB 6 Groups
MB  17 National
MB 40 Regional
SK 1 Groups
SK 13 Regional

Pacific Rim – number of computers

Pacific Rim – number of computers


At 2014 Pacific Rim with “live scores”, each of the computers play a different role:

  1. Secretarial / control computer – this is usually placed at the head judge table and is the place for the initial score entry. Judges chits are collected and collated by panel and judge number, gaps are checked. The calculated total gets written on the top-right corner of the top sheet of the stapled stack.
  2. Main computer– this is the main computer where scores are double checked, finalized and displayed. This table caught errors like data entry, misinterpreted scores because of handwriting, missing deductions, penalty versus final scores and more. It is essential to have this dual entry process on major competitions.
  3. Main display At Pacific Rim, we used only one computer to drive 2 large monitors – one aimed towards the judges and the other towards the audiences. They used an audio-video matrix switch that allows “splitting/switching” signals to multiple TV/screens. Furthermore, they use hdmi-ethernet extender to get the signals go from one end of the carpet to another. If you do not have such extenders and switches, you have to pair each display with its own display driving laptop.
  4. Music – this is the computer where all the competition music are stored on the hard drive and played. Furthermore, this was used to play the national anthems and march out during one of the award ceremonies.
    Not all computers are equal, it should be fine as long as you do not use a bottom of the line net-book or tablet. It has to have Microsoft Office.
  5. Warm up area for score inquiries and display – for coaches, there is a limited time window to file a protest. If the coaches cannot see the scores at the warm up gym, it makes it almost impossible to keep within the window. Where there is live scores, people can check scores via their smart phones. At international competitions, it is not reasonable to assume coaches to have internet access.
  6. Video review – this was never used at Pacific Rim but it was configured and ready to be used. Know how your video’s are captured and make sure you have the right connections / card reader to facilitate this. At Pacific Rim, videos are captured and tagged by ViaSport Productions and so this computer requires internet access.
  7. Backup – it is always a good idea to have a backup computer. Actually we did need to replace one of the computers at the event.

Only the main computer, the main display computer and the display inside the warmup area requires internet access. Video review also requires internet access in this instance. USB stick is used for shuttling files if and when needed for all the other computers.

Digital music is here to stay!

Digital music is here to stay!

Pacific Rim 2014 came and gone and believe it or not, we always finish slightly ahead of schedule.
Yes, digital music rocks! There were indeed some interesting challenges but nothing that slowed us down.

  • Digital music files were used for the entire competition. However, performances were still using CDs. Guess what, the CD player decided to bite-the-dust halfway through and did cause some stressful moments.
  • Placement of speakers – the speakers were shared with trampoline. After getting conflicting requests of being “Too loud, lower the volume” by the audiences, and then immediately by the judges “Can’t hear the music, crank it up” and then again “Too loud” from others really got us scrambling. Finally, we solved the problem not by volume itself but the angle & balance of the speakers. Placement of speakers in opposing sides facing each other is less than ideal.
  • Even though we officially requested for MP3s, music submitted had a variety of other codecs like wav, m4a, aif and more. I tested out the music when they were collected and tagged. I know that everything works fine using my computer. However, at the venue, the computer tested bite-the-dust and we had to use a borrowed laptop with a different Windows version and found that a couple of files did not work and had to be ripped again at the venue. Good thing that was discovered during training. MP3s and wav files are the most universally portable formats with the longest history. So do stay with proven codecs or you may discover problems when you play it on a different computer.
  • The music organizing and playing was so easy to use that after one of the breaks, we didn’t even think of checking to see if the music person is back before starting the competition. That did cause a little bit of a scramble but it all worked out. 🙂
  • There was a little bit of a learning curve in preparing digital music for some countries. However, that all happened a couple of weeks prior to the event. Some tried copying their music files directly from CDs versus ripping it. However, CDA files that you see on CDS are simply indices to the music but not the music itself. Therefore, they had to re-submit again. However, all these communication and transport can be done quickly over the net.

What worked well?

  • Simple to use, training took less than a couple of minutes. Collection is easy to use but requires slightly more training.
  • People liked the flexibility of music submission through mainstream file-share services.
  • For Pacific Rim, the rotation draw order is by country. Each country can decide its own start order at the technical meeting which doesn’t give too much lead time. After an athlete’s music were tagged during music collection, the change of start order involves very little additional work.
  • No mad sorting before a rotation means that the job can be handled by one person and can take breaks with everyone else.
  • No long wait time because of CD load times and therefore no angry coaches and judges. If it work during training, it work during competition. The music plays almost instantaneously at the press of a button.
  • For finals, once we fed it the correct rotation as generated from the scoring program, the music system is ready – no re-sorting or re-tagging required. At Pacific Rim at the finals, we actually had to substitute 2 athletes within a couple of hours before start time but all we had to do is to update the rotation and it is ready. At national championship, after collecting and tagging it once for competition A, competition B music can be ready within minutes the rotation is published.
  • It is so easy to use that I think the commentator may double as the music person when desperate.
  • If your music conforms to the naming convention of “name – apparatus” where “name” is first and last name, you are ready for nationals!

Looking forward to seeing the software used at Westerns and Nationals!